निशुम्भभरनम्रोर्वीखर्विताः पर्वता अपि | यं नमन्तीव नृत्यन्तं नमामस्तं विनायकम् || [Owing to the crushing weight capable of bending even the earth, the mountains too seem to bow down, we salute that dancing Vināyaka] 1. Once, Naravāhanadatta ventured out for hunting along with his friend Gomukha and entered into the dense forest. Mesmerised by the divine music accompanied by vīṇā in the forest, they followed the direction of the music and...
One day, the king was having his meal. Guṇaśarmā, who sat in his proximity refused to eat a certain dish which was brought to him by the cook. When asked the reason for his act, he said – ‘Even as I saw it, I came to know that it is filled with poison! You can test it by having it fed to someone else; I will then relieve him of poison and cure him!; When the king asked the cook to eat the particular dish, he fell unconscious upon eating....
  चलत्कर्णानिलोद्धूत सिन्धूरारुणिताम्बरः। जयत्यकालेऽपि सृजन् सन्धामिव गजाननः॥   Victory to Gajānana, who reddens the sky with sindhūra scattered by the wind from the constant flapping of his ears, creating a sense of sunset even when it’s not the hour of dusk!   1. One day when Naravāhanadatta was in his father's assembly hall, a divine personage descended from the sky and introduced himself as Vajraprabha, a king of the vidyādharas,...
Naravāhanadatta and Gomukha bathed in the garden well, partook their meals in the middle court of the palace, drank well, and ate tāmbūla. That night, besotted by Karpūrikā, Naravāhanadatta was unable to fall asleep and Rājyadhara told him, "Why do you worry? You will obtain your beloved. Lakṣmī herself woos those with sattva and good character. I have seen this with my own eyes!" Then he narrated the following tale: The Story of Sukhadhana King...
The Story of Indīvarasena and Anicchāsena In the town of Airāvati, there lived a king named Parityāgasena. He had two wives, of which one was his minister's daughter, Adhikasaṅgamā. The other was a princess from a royal family and was called Kāvyālaṅkārā. Being childless, he and his wives propitiated Devī Ambikā, who appeared in a dream gave him two fruits and instructed him as follows: “Mahārāja! Give these to your wives. Two valorous sons will...
The following day, when they all assembled in the court, Marubhūti hung his head down with shame. Looking at him, Ratnaprabhā said, “Ārya-putra! You are truly fortunate to have your childhood friends as ministers. They too are fortunate to have their childhood friend as the king of the land. This is indeed a fortuitous result of the (good) karmas from former births!” When he heard these words, Tapantaka remarked, “It is true that he has become...
The story continued from the previous episode... The next day the wedding took place with Agni as the witness. It was like a rājahaṃsa – a royal swan - uniting with a lotus born in the marsh. He spent some time with her and then decided to go back to his place, Vardhamānapura along with her. Rūpaśikhā said, ‘This should happen covertly; my father shouldn’t even get a hint of it; he wouldn’t allow me; if he follows us, I’ll make his brain go dull...
Himalaya
Then Hariśikhā said “Yes, this is indeed so. Virtuous women don’t even think of any man other than their beloved husband!” and began to narrate this story- The Story of Guṇavarā and Rūpaśikhā The prosperous kingdom of Vardhamānapura was ruled by the mighty King Vīrabhuja. He had hundreds of wives. Among them all, Guṇavarā was his dearest, whom he loved more than his own life. Vīrabhuja had everything, but there was still a big void in his life...
The Story of Bhavaśarmā ‘Dear friend, never get caught by women. Their minds are always hard to understand.’ A beautiful brāhmaṇa woman named Somadayā lived in Vārāṇasī. Unbeknownst to anyone, she was a yoginī. Egged on by fate, I came to befriend her and fell in love with her. One day, in a fit of jealousy and anger, I struck her. She could not tolerate me beating her but stomached her anger. The following day, under the pretext of love-play,...
Upon listening to this story Gomukha said, “Women are lustful by nature and a pativratā is rare to find. It is true that women are never to be trusted!” and narrated the following tale – Story of Niścayadatta and Anurāgaparā There lived a merchant named Niścayadatta in Ujjayinī. Every day, he bathed in the Kṣiprā river, worship Mahākāla, perform dāna to brāhmaṇas and the needy, and anointed himself with sandalwood paste. He would dab the unguent...